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1 Ethnic Minority Groups In China

Brown, Waka Takahashi; Tsai, Robin
ETHNICMINOR
U.S.A., Leland Stanford Junior University Board of Trustees, 2003, Spiral, Very Good

Book, Very good condition. No interior writing or highlighting. CD-ROM included. Ethnic Minority Groups In China By Brown, Waka Takahashi; Tsai, Robin : Product Details: Ethnic Minority Groups in China Full Unit Published 2003 (221 pages) While many outside of China believe that China is an ethnically homogeneous nation, it is actually quite diverse. This unit challenges students to examine this notion of homogeneity of Asian countries and also offers students a chance to examine the experiences and challenges of another country's ethnic groups. In today's world of diverse cultures and increasing interdependence, it is important and relevant for all students to study issues regarding identity and culture and how and why they are relevant. However, these sensitive issues are often very difficult to address. Through studying about ethnic minority groups in China, students can apply what they have learned about another country's experiences and challenges to studies of their own society and culture. In addition to learning about the variety of conflicts that surround being a minority in China, students will learn about the geographic distribution, history, language, and culture of various ethnic minority groups in China. The four minority groups chosen for this unit are the Hui, Tibetans, Mongols, and Miao. The case of the Hui illustrates what it means to have a created identity and group consciousness centering around their religion, but not exclusively so. The lesson on the Tibetans centers on their struggle for sovereignty. Mongols, including dwindling numbers of pastoralists, large numbers of farmers, and some city-dwellers, face issues of assimilation and a changing identity. To the southwest, the Miao deal with issues of representation and stereotyping. While these minority groups are very different from each other, they do share the common experience of living as minorities in China. Lesson One sets the context for the entire unit by familiarizing students with ethnic minority issues on a general level, starting with notions of identity. Part One of this lesson challenges students to reflect on their own sense of Introduction to Lessons identity and to think about what defines them both as individuals and as members of particular groups. Students learn to make connections between the ways in which they think about their own identities and how these identities provide them with a feeling of belonging. Students also explore additional criteria used in categorizing themselves and others. Part Two assesses students' current perceptions of Chinese society. Later, after students have completed the entire curriculum unit, they will be asked to reassess their ideas. Students also engage in a "classification" activity in which they receive a photograph of a person in China and explore criteria used to classify minority groups in China. Part Three equips students with more detailed information regarding minority groups in China. As part of an optional activity, images pertaining to China's ethnic minorities are analyzed and discussed for their significance. Students debrief this lesson with a class discussion. Lesson Two explores the notion of "ethnogenesis" and how it relates to the Hui, a diverse minority group in China whose sense of group identity has been influenced by government policy. Part One revisits the classification activity from Lesson One, and students write a short description on how they believe the Hui have been classified. Through an informational handout, students then learn about the history of the Hui, their relations with the Chinese, the role religion plays in their lives, and the concept of "ethnogenesis." After answering and discussing the questions on the handout, they view and discuss images of the Hui. Part Two explores Hui, Han, and official government points of view regarding the situation of minority groups in China. Students then present to their classmates the opinions voiced in these intervi 
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